Archive for April, 2015

Cites & Insights 15:5 (May 2015) available

Monday, April 6th, 2015

The May 2015 Cites & Insights (15:5) is now available for downloading at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i5.pdf

The 2-column print-oriented version is 24 pages long.

If you’re reading it online or on an e-reader (tablet, etc.), or if you want working links, you may prefer the one-column 6×9″ version (46 pages long), available at http://citesandinsights.info/civ15i5on.pdf

This issue includes:

The Front: The Open Access Landscape  pp. 1-3

Notes on the series of blog posts that began in early March 2015 and will continue through either mid-September or mid-November; the potential book that would combine those posts and add new material; and the possibility of a five-year longitudinal study of the state of gold OA (2011-2015) in 2016, if funding becomes available.

Libraries: FriendFeed, Going. LSW, Not.  pp. 3-10

An elegy (of sorts) for FriendFeed, scheduled to disappear on April 9 (unless Facebook listens to InfoWorld and others and lets it keep going)–and to the Library Society of the World, which in its own informal way has meant so much to me and many others.

Social Networks: Slightly More Than 140 Characters Words Sentences Paragraphs About Twitter  pp. 10-19

A possibly-amusing set of mostly-old musings by others about Twitter’s inevitable decline and fall, certainly gone by now, and the decline of Western civilization–also why it’s nothing but a note-taking system and the need for balance.

The Back  pp. 19-24

Ten brief (and some not-so-brief) rants and amusements.

 

The Open Access Landscape: 6. Chemistry

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

Chemistry as a subject doesn’t seem to require much clarification (noting that most biochem ended up in Biology). This subject includes 136 OA journals that published 12,258 articles in 2013 and almost exactly the same number (12,429) in 2014.

Grades

Grade Journals %J Articles %A A/J
A

72

53%

5,431

44%

75

Free

57

79%

3,114

57%

55

Pay

15

21%

2,317

43%

154

A$ pay

14

10%

5,123

42%

366

B

15

11%

610

5%

41

Free

6

40%

153

25%

26

Pay

9

60%

457

75%

51

C

11

8%

725

6%

66

Free

2

18%

122

17%

61

Pay

4

36%

365

50%

91

Unk

5

45%

238

33%

48

D

24

18%

369

3%

15

Free

15

63%

242

66%

16

Pay

9

38%

127

34%

14

Table 6.1. Journals and articles by grade

Table 6.1 shows the number of journals and 2013 articles for each grade, the free, pay and unknown numbers, and average articles per journal. Note that boldface percentages (grades) are percentages of all chemistry journals, while others (free, pay, unknown) are percentages of the particular grade (so, for example, 8% of the journals are grade C, highly questionable, and 36% of those eight journals require APCs and say what they are).

Since A$ means an APC of $1,000 or higher, all A$ journals are in the Pay category and the redundant line is omitted. Chemistry is an extreme case of the expensive journals having many more articles than other journals—with 10% of the journals, this group published 42% of the articles, more than twice as many per journal as less expensive apparently-good journals. Note that most apparently-good journals that don’t cost $1,000 or more per article don’t charge APCs at all—79% of them, publishing a majority of the articles in that group.

The group of D journals includes these subgroups: C: seven journals, publishing 85 articles in 2013 and 59 in 2014; no D journals; E: two journals publishing seven articles in 2013—but 41 in 2014; H: four journals publishing 242 articles in 2013 but only 113 in 2014; N: one journal, no articles in either year; S: ten journals publishing 35 articles in 2013 but only 17 in 2014 (noting that S journals are sometimes annuals and publish on a delayed basis).

Article Volume (including all of 2014)

2014 2013 2012 2011
Journals

123

126

115

99

%Free

61%

61%

59%

58%

Articles

12,261

12,020

11,139

9,016

%Free

29%

30%

32%

37%

Table 6.2. Journals and articles by date

Table 6.2 shows the number of free and APC-charging journals that published articles in each year, including all of 2014, how many articles those journals published, and what percentage were free.

The five “unknown” journals (with 238 articles in 2013) are omitted from all figures and percentages. The numbers may still not add up because there are some journals that don’t publish articles in any given year—five of them in 2013, for example.

The percentage of free journals is fairly typical of OA in general and, somewhat oddly for STEM, actually increased over the past few years. On the other hand, the percentage of articles appearing in free journals is quite low (although higher than biology) and has declined significantly since 2011.

These journals published slightly more articles in 2014 than in 2013, after mild growth from 2012 and significant growth from 2011. Note that, as always, journals that began in 2014 (or appeared in DOAJ after May 7, 2014) are not included; you might expect 5% more journals based on past history, but most of them probably wouldn’t publish a lot in the first year.

Looked at on a journal-by-journal basis, 64 journals published more articles in 2014 than in 2013; eight published the same number; and 64 published fewer articles in 2014—a nicely symmetric set of results. In terms of significant change, 53 journals (39%) published at least 10% more articles in 2014 than in 2013; 33 (24%) were relatively unchanged; and 50 (37%) published at least 10% fewer articles, including six that have not yet published any 2014 articles.

Journals No-Fee % Articles No-Fee %
Prolific

2

0%

2,406

0%

Large

17

47%

5,903

39%

Medium

25

68%

2,107

72%

Small

58

18%

1,542

19%

Sparse

34

66%

300

61%

Table 6.3. Journals by peak article volume

Table 6.3 shows the number of journals in each size range, 2013 articles for journals in that group, and what percentage is in no-free journals. The picture here is a bit unusual: Although, as usual, prolific journals charge APCs and larger journals tend to charge APCs, with the percentage of free journals getting larger as the volume of articles gets smaller, small chemistry journals (20 to 59 articles in the peak year) mostly do charge APCs, unlike medium-size and sparse journals.

Fees (APCs)

APC Jour. %Fee %All Art. %Fee %All
High

5

10%

4%

2,473

29%

21%

Medium

21

41%

16%

2,878

34%

24%

Low

11

22%

8%

1,037

12%

9%

Nominal

14

27%

11%

2,001

24%

17%

None

80

61%

3,631

30%

Table 6.4. Journals and articles by fee range

Table 6.4 shows the number of journals in each fee range and the number of 2013 articles for those journals. Since the fee ranges are based on quartiles of this universe, deviations from 25% in the first %Fee column represent differences between chemistry journals and OA as a whole—considerably fewer high-fee journals ($1,451 and up) and considerably more medium-fee ($601 to $1,450). Most fee-paid articles are in journals with medium or high fees. There is a modest correlation (0.31) between APC level and peak volume of articles.

Starting Dates and the Gold Rush

Year Total Free%
1970-79

1

0%

1980-89

3

67%

1990-91

1

100%

1996-97

6

67%

1998-99

3

100%

2000-01

5

60%

2002-03

5

100%

2004-05

7

100%

2006-07

16

63%

2008-09

15

33%

2010-11

42

45%

2012-13

31

68%

Table 6.5. Starting dates for chemistry OA journals

Table 6.5 shows OA journals by starting date, including the percentage of journals started in each date range that currently don’t charge APCs. There are very few old chemistry journals that are currently OA—none before 1970 and only five total prior to 1996—and in this case the gold rush, such as it is, appears to run from 2008 to 2011. Figure 6.1 shows essentially the same information as Table 6.5, but as a graph with lines for free and APC-charging journals. I’ve included markers for APC-charging journals, since otherwise nothing would appear before 2006. Note gaps in dates in the graph—and the empty space for 1970-79 is because the single OA journal started in that period has an unknown APC.

Figure 6.1. Chemistry journals by starting date

Year Journals Articles Art/Jrnl
1970-79

1

48

48

1980-89

3

1,021

340

1990-91

1

258

258

1996-97

6

1,370

228

1998-99

3

348

116

2000-01

5

1,607

321

2002-03

4

345

86

2004-05

6

441

74

2006-07

15

2,363

158

2008-09

15

1,454

97

2010-11

41

1,651

40

2012-13

31

1,352

44

Table 6.6. Articles per journal by starting date

Table 6.6 shows journals that published articles in 2013, when they started, how many articles they published in 2013 and the average articles per journal. The numbers are all over the place, with notably prolific journals starting in the 1980s, 1996-97 and 2000-2001.

Definitions and notes

See The Open Access Landscape: 1. Background for definitions and notes

If you’re interested in a book-form version of this material (with an additional bonus graph added in each chapter), let me know, either in a comment or by email to waltcrawford at gmail dot com

Ten Years of W.a.R.

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

Ten years. I’ve been doing this for ten years.

The first post on Walt at Random appeared on April 1, 2005; the date was intentional.

Back then, I still worked at RLG. (Back then, there still was an RLG.) I was still writing two columns, one in EContent and one in Online. Cites & Insights was in its fifth year. And the blog seemed like a good idea at the time.

Since then? More than 2,000 posts (the dashboard says 1,990, but I’ve deleted some posts such as announcements of Lulu sales). 4,118 posted comments (almost none in recent years), plus 105,113 spamments and counting.

Here’s a look at posting frequency—counting only posts that are still available:

 

Maybe you can see a pattern in that graph, other than things completely falling apart in 2014. I can’t.

Major categories: Writing and blogging; Cites & Insights; Movies and TV; Books and publishing…and Stuff, which is partly posts I forget to categorize.

I’d link to the very first post, but I keep getting the fourth post when I try to do that. Not very interesting anyway.

Looking back ten years, I do notice one thing: there are several minor items I’ve thought about blogging about…and it turns out I already did. Ten years ago.

As for overall statistics: I haven’t a clue. (Yeah, I know, but also not about overall W.a.R. statistics.) The program that’s currently running only shows statistics for the current month. As of yesterday (when I’m actually writing this), March 31, 2015, at about 5 a.m., here’s what I see:

6.213 unique visitors. 2,2690 visits from people, with 57,291 pages. Another 183,181 pages (192,745 hits) of “not viewed traffic”—robots, worms, etc.

The summary does show other months for the current year; turns out uniqwue visitors is nearly constant, at 6,189-6,298 per month.

As for the most visited pages for March 2015? That’s an odd lot. Excluding overhead (/feed/ and the like):

  • Signs of Spring (April 16, 2011), 2,420 views—a post about our photovoltaic system. Really?
  • Post-OCLC: A midterm update (August 7, 2007), 1,359 views—now that’s just sad. (I should note that I got lots of kind words during the process, but also that there’s one library director I hope never to encounter again, as he made a point of saying how wonderful it was that RLG had been merged, resulting in my job loss—and that was all he—and of course it was a he—said. Apparently simply not responding wasn’t an option, where gratuitous salt-rubbing was.)
  • The Open Access Landscape: 1. Background (March 3, 2015), 649 views—finally, a current post.
  • The Open Access Landscape: 2. Agriculture (March 6, 2015), 415 views

And a mix of old and new with fewer than 400 views.

The #1 search keyphrase: “what is a peachcot”

Which seems like an ideal place to end this blogiversary post.