Test

January 23rd, 2020

This is a test of whether this blog is now the version at my new hosting site, which I should be able to verify based on timestamps. Nothing to see here…

A few notes on the first 3,000

January 21st, 2020

Followup: some notes on the first 3,000 journals–partly to show just how unrepresentative any sample is. Compare this to the first21,000… This is not at all a representative sample (I sort by publisher, then journal, because that speeds things up).

A few items do seem interesting.

  • Of the 2,826 journals for which data has been recorded (174 are either unavailable or have malware issues), 1,086 have fees.
  • Of that 1,086, I find that ten have submission fees–and 20 others have both submission and processing fees. 101 others have fees that vary based on article length (I don’t record that if the surcharge begins at 11 pages or higher).
  • In 468 of the 1,086 cases, I gathered the fee status and amount from the DOAJ record because it was not easy to locate within the journal’s website.
  • Malware is still with us: 78 of the 174 for which I don’t yet have data recorded were flagged by Malwarebytes–an uncomfortably high figure. 712 others don’t seem to be there or are unworkable…and two aren’t OA journals, AFAICT.
  • In 56 cases where I do have data, the URL in DOAJ did not yield the website but a journal title search in Chrome did yield the website.
  • At DOAJ’s request, I’ve sent them the spreadsheet segment involving malware and unavailability. If the project continues, I’ll do that for every 3,000 journals.

If you’re looking for C&I..

January 21st, 2020

At this point, cical.info will get you to the version of Cites & Insights that will stick around for at least two more years. (That was the original domain: citesandinsights.info is a pseudonym.) I’m working on getting the pseudonym restored.

Meanwhile, waltcrawford.name is now on its long-term host…

As for Walt at Random: working on it.

A little plug for A2Hosting.com. my new host: VERY service-oriented and fast.

A few notes on the first 2,000

January 14th, 2020

Followup: some notes on the first 2,000 journals–partly to show just how unrepresentative any sample is. Compare this to the first 1,000… This is not at all a representative sample (I sort by publisher, then journal, because that speeds things up).

A few items do seem interesting.

  • Of the 1,866 journals for which data has been recorded (134 are either unavailable or have malware issues), 692 have fees. (Easy explanation: BMC’s 360-odd journals are in the second 1,000; almost all have fees.)
  • Of that 692, I find that ninehave submission fees–and 19 others have both submission and processing fees. 60 others have fees that vary based on article length (I don’t record that if the surcharge begins at 11 pages or higher).
  • In 345 of the 946 cases, I gathered the fee status and amount from the DOAJ record because it was not easy to locate within the journal’s website.
  • Malware is still with us: 65 of the 134 for which I don’t yet have data recorded were flagged by Malwarebytes–an uncomfortably high figure (but about half of those are in one series). 52 others don’t seem to be there…and two aren’t OA journals, AFAICT
  • In 34 cases where I do have data, the URL in DOAJ did not yield the website but a journal title search in Chrome did yield the website.

Paperback version of C&I 19 now available

January 13th, 2020
ci19

The paperback version of Cites & Insights 2019, including indexes that are exclusive to that version, is now available from Lulu for $25. (I plan to adjust all C&I prices to a standard level, for the final year of availability, in the near future.)

The cover for this final paperback builds on nine previous cover images.

You can find it directly at http://www.lulu.com/shop/walt-crawford/cites-insights-19-2019/paperback/product-24393000.html

(or just go to Lulu and search for Cites & Insights 2019).

If you hurry, you can use coupon code ONEFIVE and save 15%–good through January 16.

A few notes on the first 1000

January 7th, 2020

I’ve started gathering data for GOA5–articles from 2014 through 2019–and have reached the first milestone, the first 1,000 journals. This is not at all a representative sample (I sort by publisher, then journal, because that speeds things up)–to suggest that 7% of a wildly heterogeneous set of journals is representative would be to commit the kind of error that only true academics can get away with.

But a few items do seem interesting.

  • Of the 946 journals for which data has been recorded (54 are either unavailable or have malware issues), 273 have fees.
  • Of that 273, I find that seven have submission fees–and 19 others have both submission and processing fees. 46 others have fees that vary based on article length (I don’t record that if the surcharge begins at 11 pages or higher).
  • In 221 of the 946 cases, I gathered the fee status and amount from the DOAJ record because it was not easy to locate within the journal’s website.
  • Malware is still with us: 23 of the 54 for which I don’t yet have data recorded were flagged by Malwarebytes. 29 others don’t seem to be there…
  • In 21 cases where I do have data, the URL in DOAJ did not yield the website but a journal title search in Chrome did yield the website.

That’s it for now. Nothing earth-shattering. Are submission fees a growing trend? It’s way too early to say.

An unfond farewell to 2019

December 31st, 2019

I don’t normally write year-end posts, but the last few months have been exceptional. (In case you’re wondering, I’m not going to discuss politics, so as to avoid existential despair.)

Oh, the first part of the year–pretty much up to November–was fine. Did GOA4 (there’s the first half of the year), then started reading more books and the like–and made a probably overdue decision to shut down Cites & Insights, setting in motion a series of cleanup essays.

It’s the last two months that made 2019 so very special:

  • In mid-November, I wound up in the hospital for 11 nights, thanks to a roaring staph infection that had probably been building for months and apparently slowing me down for at least a few months. (I finish the antibiotics course on January 1…it’s a 60-day process *after* hospital release.)
  • In early December, I was back in the hospital, this time for four nights thanks to an intestinal blockage. No surgery required, but spent most of three days with no food or liquids, just intravenous fluids.
  • As a side note, I had not been in a hospital for more than one night in perhaps 50 years. Yes, I’ve been lucky.
  • Turns out both probably had something to do with the robotic-assisted prostatectomy of roughly two years ago: around 30% of the time, this faster and safer form of prostatectomy leads fluid sacs and/or adhesions.
  • By the way, the prostatectomy itself seems to have been wholly successful: PSA numbers since have been consistently too low to measure.
  • While the staph infection has no long-term consequences, once I get enough Activia in me to restore the biome, the same is not true for the obstruction, since no surgery was done: it means changing my diet, probably permanently, in a number of annoying ways (which, among other things, make it difficult to get enough calories: I was 160lb. before the hospitalization, 148lb. when I came out, and after 20+ days am struggling to get above 15o–aiming for 155lb, but that may take months). I’ll miss cashews and other nuts, Clif bars and anything else with rolled oats, raw carrots, raw spinach, raw… oh, and raw fruit with skins on in general. An ongoing learning process…
  • I shouldn’t forget that my spouse has been absolutely wonderful through all of this. We’ll celebrate our 42nd anniversary on 1/1/2020…
  • The web host on which this blog, and waltcrawford.name, and Cites & Insights all reside is shutting down in April 2020. Turns out that, as I’ve gotten older and more retired from a lifetime of technology work, I’ve become wary: specifically, I can’t even bring myself to start the necessary migration process. Anyone want to help?
  • Finally, just as lagniappe, the day after Christmas the keyboard on my 4-year-old Toshiba laptop went wonky: all any key would yield is l, q, – or the Windows key. After finding out that a repair, if feasible, would be at least $250 for a notebook that only cost about $400, I am now the proud possessor of a 17.3″ HP notebook, one of very few 17″-screen notebooks still available. Better CPU (8th generation Core i5 instead of, what, 2nd generation i3?), 8GB RAM–and only 250GB of storage rather than 500GB, but with a huge difference: the 250GB is SSD. (I never used more than 150GB on the old machine: I don’t do video or heavyweight photo work. Indeed, as I found when migrating data, if it wasn’t for 50GB of FLAC music files, I’d have about 6GB total to move over: text just doesn’t take much space.) I think I’ve re-established credentials at most websites I use (at least in Firefox), and I’ve reinstalled or redownloaded almost all of the programs I actually use–and the transition from Office 2015 to Office 2019 seems painless so far. (Although, when my wife finally gets a new laptop, Office 365 may be tempting: I don’t like subscription software, but a terabyte of cloud storage would make backup painless.)
  • One bit of good news here: Just as people have told me, SSD makes the new laptop a LOT faster than the old one when starting programs or doing file-based operations. I mean, three seconds to load either Word or Excel–I’ve timed it–and a second to load the 14,000-row GOA5 spreadsheet. Seems like the daily Malwarebytes scan is much, much faster as well. So yes, if you’re buying a new PC, absolutely look for SSD storage.
  • Oh, and of course I’ve now lost access to my websites, so that’s something more to work out besides the need to migrate…

So yeah, I’m hoping 2020 is less eventful than the last two months of 2019…

GOA4: December 2019 update

December 31st, 2019


Readership for the new edition and GOAJ3. As always, readership figures omit most of the last day of each month, because of the tools available.

All links available from the project home page, as always.

GOA4: 2013-2018

  • The dataset: 391 views, 117 downloads.
  • GOA4: 1,708 PDF ebooks and one paperback.
  • Countries 4: 382 PDF ebooks
  • Subjects and Publishers: 279 PDF ebooks

GOAJ3: 2012-2017

  • The dataset: 1,675 views, 307 downloads
  • GOAJ3: 3,691 PDF ebooks + 450 copies of first few chapters (C&I 18.3)
  • Countries: 1,133 PDF ebooks
  • Subject supplement (C&I 18.4): 576 downloads
  • One paperback

 

 

 



Cites & Insights Final Issue (19:9) available

December 26th, 2019

The final issue of Cites & Insights (19:9) is now available for downloading at https://citesandinsights.info/civ19i9.pdf

The 20-page issue includes:

The Front: The Final Issue pp. 1-8

Some notes on 19 years of C&I–the longest and shortest volumes and issues, possibly the most widely-read issues, and a chronological list of the long essays (that turned out to be much longer and more varied than expected). Includes brief notes on the five years of C&I’s predecessors.

Nostalgia pp. 8-20

Some commentary on relatively old (usually) items not previously discussed, on predictions, gengen, failure, blogging and librarians. (Also known as clearing out Diigo for the last time…)

The paperback version of Volume 19 will appear sometime in the first half of 2020, and the C&I home page will be replaced with a final static version in late January–and, if I’m able to migrate properly, will stay around for at least another year.

Cites & Insights 19:8 (December 2019) available

December 11th, 2019

Cites & Insights 19:8 (December 2019) is now available for downloading at https://citesandinsights.info/civ19i8.pdf

The 51-page issue, delayed for a period because of unexpected health issues, includes:

Libraries pp. 1-9

Mostly material from several years ago, that still seems applicable today.

Media pp. 9-16

One group of items on books and reading, another on music and audio.

Intersections: Open Access Issues pp. 16-36

The last OA roundup in C&I, dealing with myths, impact, access, DOAJ and miscellany.

Media: Warriors Classic 50 Movies, 1 pp. 36-51

Twenty-four peplum/sword and sandals movies.

This is not (probably the final issue; that should appear in very late December (possibly as late as December 34 or so…)