Archive for December 24th, 2012

Want HTML versions of Cites & Insights essays? It’s your click

Posted in Cites & Insights on December 24th, 2012

The survey on Cites & Insights format preferences and section preferences is now closed.

Twelve people participated. Thanks!

Sorry the rest of you didn’t have the time.

Results of the survey will appear in Cites & Insights 13:1, probably out the first week of January 2013.

Based on responses to format questions, and my own experience trying the one-column “online format” on an 8.9″-screen tablet (see other post), I’m going to keep both PDF formats, at least for a while.

The HTML separates, on the other hand, I’m not so sure about. I’ve never been wholly satisfied with the way they look; they don’t work right if a post has graphs or other illustrations; they’re a mild pain to produce. And, it turns out, at least in Silk, they appear entirely in whatever dreary sans typeface the Kindle uses when it’s not showing what it recognizes as book-style text.

So: If you really want HTML versions of C&I essays, it’s up to you…to pay for them.

Total voluntary financial support for Cites & Insights in 2012 has not reached three digits, or even high two digits.

If you want HTML essays, contribute–the PayPal secure Donate button’s right there on the home page.

If I see at least $1,000 in donations between now and the time I’m ready to publish the February 2013 issue–which I’m guessing will be around January 20-22, 2013–then I’ll keep doing HTML separates at least through 2013.

If I don’t get even within shouting range of that total, I’ll probably drop them: The one-column 6×9 PDF format should meet the needs of most e-readers. And, y’know, considering the price…

Purchases of C&I annual volumes will count as contributions, at the full rate of $50 each, even though I don’t net nearly that much. And you get great travel photos on the covers, plus indexes that are not otherwise available. (The indexes alone are worth, well…more than nothing.)

 

Florida public libraries

Posted in $4 on December 24th, 2012

Another post commenting on Chapter 20 of Give Us a Dollar and We’ll Give You Back Four (2012-13)–now available as a $9.99 Kindle ebook or $21.95 paperback, with ISBN 978-1481279161, on Amazon, along with the usual Lulu options.

Like California (but more so), Florida has relatively few libraries and systems for its population: 80 (all in the tables, none omitted). Funding tends toward the low side, with only 5% in the top two brackets and 21% in the top four, compared to 30% in the bottom two brackets and 59% in the bottom four. Similarly, circulation per capita tends toward the low side, with only 11% having at least 10 circ per capita (38% overall)—and patron visits are similar, with 20% having six or more (42% overall). I could say that it’s noteworthy that the median circulation for libraries in the highest spending bracket is nearly twice that of the second highest—but with only two libraries in each of those two brackets, that’s not especially meaningful (although those are the only brackets where even the 75%ile is at least 10 circ per capita). Program attendance is quite low, with 65% having less than 0.3 attendance per capita (compared to 46% overall). The same goes for PC use: 16% with at least 1.7 uses per capita, compared to 30% overall.

Libraries by legal service area

LSA Count %
1,650-2,249

1

1.3%

3,000-3,999

1

1.3%

4,000-5,299

1

1.3%

5,300-6,799

1

1.3%

6,800-8,699

1

1.3%

8,700-11,099

3

3.8%

11,100-14,099

2

2.5%

14,100-18,499

4

5.0%

18,500-24,999

4

5.0%

25,000-34,499

2

2.5%

34,500-53,999

8

10.0%

54,000-104,999

16

20.0%

105,000-4.1 mill.

36

45.0%

Circulation per capita and spending per capita

Circulation per capita correlates very strongly (0.75) with spending per capita

Circulation per capita plotted against spending per capita

Circulation per capita (rounded) occurrence by spending category

 


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