Archive for December 17th, 2012

Give Us a Dollar… now on Amazon, coming on Kindle

Posted in $4 on December 17th, 2012

buck4fy10amcvrIf your library has an Amazon account but has difficulty ordering from Lulu, or if you just prefer Amazon for various reasons–free shipping, whatever–you’ll be pleased to hear that there’s now a CreateSpace edition of Give Us a Dollar and We’ll Give You Back Four (2012-13) at Amazon.

Same price: $21.95 paperback.

As you can see from the image here, the cover is entirely different (other than the author and title, and even there the typography’s wildly different): This is one of CreateSpace’s stock covers, very different from Lulu’s stock covers.

There’s even an ISBN for this edition: 978-1481279161 (or for traditionalists, 1481279165).

The interior is absolutely identical: It’s the same PDF file.

But wait! There’s more!

Coming soon (probably Tuesday, 12/18)

Want to have the book for your Kindle?

You can–as soon as Amazon’s Kindle Direct Program makes it public. That’s supposed to be in the next eight hours in the U.S., within three days overseas.

At that point, a search for “Give Us a Dollar and We’ll Give” should bring up both editions.

The Kindle edition is $9.99 (the KDP program offers very strong incentives not to charge more than $9.99).

It looks pretty good. If you have a 7″ Kindle, you’ll probably need to go landscape for some tables, but for the DX or Fire HD 8.9, it should work fine as is. Yes, there’s a live table of contents. Some day soon, I’ll do another mini-tutorial for the Micropublishing book, describing what’s now a pretty straightforward process to turn a fully-formatted Word book into something Kindle’s happy with.

Cites & Insights survey: One week left

Posted in Cites & Insights on December 17th, 2012

If you read Cites & Insights, go take the survey. Now. It’ll only take a couple of minutes.

This is the final week in which you can take the survey. The results of the survey will–along with, hint hint, any contributions to Cites & Insights itself, maybe to bring the annual total up into the three-digit range–influence both the format options and the content for 2013.

So, while you’re thinking about it, go take the survey. If links give you trouble, here’s the URL:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/CPWRWTQ

Right now, C&I appears in three forms. If there are in fact only nine people who care enough about C&I to take the survey, then that’s at least one too many–and maybe three too many. The three, in case you’ve forgotten:

  • Two-column 8.5×11″ pages, PDF, optimized for printing, always an even number of pages: The “real” C&I.
  • Single-column 6×9″ pages, PDF, optimized for online viewing and intended for large-screen e-stuff (any of the 8.9″-10″ tablets and ebook readers, notebooks, desktops, and it shouldn’t be too bad on 7″ devices): The “eC&I.”
  • Individual articles (when the article isn’t heavy on stuff that doesn’t work well this way) in HTML form, single column, generated using Word “Save as Filtered HTML” from a template designed for web use.

The first has been around since December 2000, although there have been several changes in typography and layout over the years. It’s the only version that gets copyfitting: it is, essentially, the fully laid out version.

The second has been around since March 2012. It gets a modified Table of Contents to suit the vastly increased number of pages. It’s normally saved to PDF directly from Word, yielding a PDF with bookmarks for articles and sections.

The third has been around since January 2004, more consistently (except for one section) since Midwinter 2005, although certain single-topic issues have not appeared in HTML form.

Take the survey. I will pay attention to the results. I will read any comments you include.

Connecticut public libraries

Posted in $4 on December 17th, 2012

The seventh of 49 notes on Chapter 20 of Give Us a Dollar and We’ll Give You Back Four (2012-13), this time on the public libraries of Connecticut.

Connecticut has 178 libraries in the tables and 17 omitted libraries. Funding is generally good, with roughly 16% in each of the top four brackets ($36 and up) and less than 8% in the bottom three combined (under $21). Adjusted for Connecticut’s cost of living, the median benefit ratio for every bracket exceeds four.

Circulation is “bulgy,” with very few libraries in the highest and lowest activity brackets and quite a few in the middle brackets, but still on the high side, with 62% circulating at least eight items per capita (compared to 50% overall). There’s consistent correlation between expenditures and circulation. Visits per capita are also slightly bulgy (few libraries at either extreme). Program attendance is better than average: nearly half the libraries (46%) have at least 0.5 attendance per capita, compared to exactly one-third overall. (Expenditures correlate nicely with program success here as well.) On the other hand, PC use is on the low side: Only 8% show at least 2.25 uses per capita (compared to 19% overall) and only 46% have at least one use per capita (compared to 57% overall). Even for the best-funded libraries, the median is no more than 1.6 uses per capita.

Libraries by legal service area

LSA Count % Outliers
700-1,149

2

1.1%

1,150-1,649

4

2.2%

1,650-2,249

6

3.4%

1

2,250-2,999

6

3.4%

3,000-3,999

9

5.1%

4,000-5,299

11

6.2%

5,300-6,799

13

7.3%

6,800-8,699

9

5.1%

5

8,700-11,099

17

9.6%

11,100-14,099

15

8.4%

14,100-18,499

19

10.7%

1

18,500-24,999

18

10.1%

5

25,000-34,499

17

9.6%

2

34,500-53,999

13

7.3%

1

54,000-104,999

14

7.9%

2

105,000-4.1 mill.

5

2.8%

Circulation per capita and spending per capita

Circulation per capita correlates very strongly (0.76) with spending per capita

Circulation per capita plotted against spending per capita

Circulation per capita (rounded) occurrence by spending category


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