But Still They Blog: First review (that I’ve seen)

I’d like to call your attention to this post by Jennifer Macaulay on Just Another Day (you may know Macaulay from her previous blog, Life as I Know It).

I would quote excerpts, but it’s a nicely compact post (unlike certain blabbermouths like Walt Crawford, Jennifer Macaulay knows how to write tersely and well), so here’s the whole thing:

I find the topic of library blogs and blogging fascinating. As such, I always look forward to Walt Crawford’s commentaries about the topic. In this vein, I did buy a copy (pdf version) of his latest book, But Still They Blog. I admit that the statistical analysis made my head spin a bit (I get lost whenever quintiles come up), but the book was certainly worth a read for anyone who is interested in the seeming decline in blogging intensity within the library sphere.

After reading But Still They Blog, it is clear that people blog – and stop blogging – for a variety of reasons. People have wildly different ideas about the impact of tools like Twitter, FriendFeed, etc. on blogging – and on the worth of blogging. Ultimately, blogging isn’t dead, but it isn’t the same as it was several years ago. Crawford tells us all this through statistical analysis and through quotes from the blogs that he profiles. It is the story told through these glimpses at the various blogs which is my favorite part of the book (and is often my favorite part of many of his articles in Cites and Insights).

I am, of course, delighted by this review. (I think quintiles are the best way to model certain data, but I admit they can be daunting. Sorry about that.) Thanks, Jennifer!

Reminder

But Still They Blog: The Liblog Landscape 2007-2009 is still on sale for a special early-bird price until the end of ALA Midwinter–that is, about 18 days from now.

And a word about formats: Lulu will handle ePub now, but it’s up to me to do the conversion. If I have indications from, say, three people that they would buy an ePub version (and won’t buy the PDF or print version), that might make it worth the trouble…assuming that freely-available software does the job properly.

4 Responses to “But Still They Blog: First review (that I’ve seen)”

  1. Jennfer Macaulay Says:

    No need to apologize about the quintiles. Statistics often make me space out a little, but that is my own issue. :)

  2. Mark Says:

    Walt, what might you have to go through to generate an ePub version? How much “trouble” is it?

    I am interested in how this book would work in ePub, at least on my Touch (preferably) or the laptop, either in Stanza.

  3. walt Says:

    Mark: I really don’t know. It would require locating the right software, installing that software, learning the software, doing the conversion, uploading the conversion, and modifying the Lulu project to include the conversion. If installing & learning are both nominal, that’s still a couple of hours…

    (And, by the way, since your other email address rejects mail, thanks!)

  4. Mark Says:

    Ouch! That doesn’t sound like fun at all.

    Which email address is rejecting?


This blog is protected by dr Dave\\\\\\\'s Spam Karma 2: 104263 Spams eaten and counting...